Five reasons why you should make Dubai your MENA business hub

17 January 2019 Category :

The Rose Review, a new study commissioned by the UK Treasury, has revealed some eye-opening statistics with regard to female entrepreneurs.

The report, conducted by the Royal Bank of Scotland’s Alison Rose, found that female entrepreneurs tend to have to start new enterprises with around half as much startup capital as their male counterparts.

This funding gap is just one of many areas where the playing field on which men and women do business seems rather less than balanced.

The Rose Review also found:

  • Men start businesses at a much higher rate – should this balance be redressed, there would be 1.1 million more companies headed by women in the UK.
  • Women-only funding teams received £32m in investment in 2017 compared with the £5bn awarded to male-only teams.
  • Female-led start-ups receive just 0.5% of all funds invested by venture capital groups – the lowest level for over ten years.

To enable greater gender balance among entrepreneurs, the UK Treasury has pledged to help 600,000 more women to start their own businesses by 2030. Many UK banks and investment funds are also being urged to sign up to the new Investing in Women Code to track the amount of funding given to female entrepreneurs.

We have seen similar measures here in the UAE, with changes to visa regulations and the creation of accelerator schemes aimed at encouraging greater female entrepreneurship.

In a country where women make up 43% of the total labour force, it would be interesting to see how the UAE would compare with the Rose Review’s findings.

The Rose Review, a new study commissioned by the UK Treasury, has revealed some eye-opening statistics with regard to female entrepreneurs.

The report, conducted by the Royal Bank of Scotland’s Alison Rose, found that female entrepreneurs tend to have to start new enterprises with around half as much startup capital as their male counterparts.

This funding gap is just one of many areas where the playing field on which men and women do business seems rather less than balanced.

The Rose Review also found:

  • Men start businesses at a much higher rate – should this balance be redressed, there would be 1.1 million more companies headed by women in the UK.
  • Women-only funding teams received £32m in investment in 2017 compared with the £5bn awarded to male-only teams.
  • Female-led start-ups receive just 0.5% of all funds invested by venture capital groups – the lowest level for over ten years.

To enable greater gender balance among entrepreneurs, the UK Treasury has pledged to help 600,000 more women to start their own businesses by 2030. Many UK banks and investment funds are also being urged to sign up to the new Investing in Women Code to track the amount of funding given to female entrepreneurs.

We have seen similar measures here in the UAE, with changes to visa regulations and the creation of accelerator schemes aimed at encouraging greater female entrepreneurship.

In a country where women make up 43% of the total labour force, it would be interesting to see how the UAE would compare with the Rose Review’s findings.

Read the full article here

About the author: Paul Bryson, Director of Domestic Structuring at Virtuzone.

About the author: Paul Bryson, Director of Domestic Structuring at Virtuzone.

Paul Bryson is the Director of Domestic Structuring at Virtuzone, based in Dubai, UAE. He is also a member of the Board of Directors for the British Business Group, Dubai and Northern Emirates. A knowledgeable and active member of the business community in the UAE, Paul advises large multi-nationals and small startup businesses on how to best establish commercial presence in Dubai and across the rest of the UAE and Gulf region. Before embarking on his career in the Emirates, Paul graduated from the University of the West of Scotland with a Diploma in International Business.